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  • Mathematics In Europe - Newsletter 8 Autumn 1999
    mail addresses of chief organizers of WGA and TSG can be seen on our official home page http www ma kagu sut ac jp icme9 We shall distribute the Second Announcement in this summer to every corner of the world inviting earnestly every interested people to the ICME 9 Chair of IPC President of NOC ICME 9 Hiroshi FUJITA Buenos Aires Argentina The Centre of Mathematics and Design MAyDI from the University of Buenos Aires has organized a national call to all Architecture and Design students of the whole country to participate on the bid for exhibition of posters in the Buenos Aires subway The selection will be made by highly qualified members such as the Director of the School of Graphic Design at the University of Buenos Aires and the Director of the Research Centre MAyDI Metrovias a private enterprise has offered us free space to expose the posters for a month in the 2000 at all stations of the net The Centre MAyDI has also organized another national contest to select an issue of commemorative stamps celebrating WMY 2000 Correos Argentinos is managing freely the reception of the presentations and will edit the winner stamp next year For both contests we have performed a funding campaign with some industrial firms newspapers phone companies scientific journals domestic flight companies editorials professional associations etc The purpose of this campaign is to get contributions money supplies like books journal subscriptions printers software etc to cover first second and third prizes as well as 10 special mentions The prizes will be given at a public ceremony 13 14 December 1999 and winners from the provinces will get free tickets and 2 nights in a central hotel to receive them personally Contact Vera W de Spinadel Director of the Centre of Mathematics and Design MAyDI E mail Bu e Posta adresi istenmeyen posta engelleyicileri tarafından korunuyor Görüntülemek için JavaScript etkinleştirilmelidir Web page http members xoom com maydi WMY 2000 IN BEJAIA ALGERIA The Bejaia University organizes many events during the World mathematical Year An approach of the great mathematical challenges for the next century Special session of mathematical seminar Industrial Mathematics and Computer Science Bejaia University and Sonacotrach Edfmia Sonelgaz etc Image of Mathematics A Ribaucour in Algeria Mathematical contribution in Geometry construction of Bejaia s Harbour Play for children 01 June 2000 during the World Child Day Leonardo Fibonacci in Bejaia about the long stay of Fibonacci in Bejaia Internet and Mathematics in Bejaia Internet and Teaching Exhibitions and Conferences for general public Mathematics and development between the IX and XIX centuries interconnexion between Algebra Computation Geometry Astrology Social Sciences etc Mathematical contribution of Maghrebian Mathematicians before and now WMY 2000 in Canada In the Spring of 1997 the Canadian Mathematical Society CMS created a Committee for WMY 2000 with a mandate to develop proposals for events during the year 2000 to make mathematics more visible in Canada It was suggested that these events should be noticeably different from standard CMS activities should recognize the diversity of mathematics and mathematical interests in Canada and should be imaginative while recognizing the three aims of the IMU in its Declaration of Rio de Janeiro Chaired by Bernard R Hodgson Université Laval current Secretary of ICMI this Committee met at several physical locations as well as electronically gathered suggestions from across Canada and submitted its report in September 1998 The CMS has now committed 50 000 to these WMY 2000 proposals In addition to the CMS initiative other Canadian mathematical societies and institutes have proposed activities to celebrate WMY 2000 This report presents highlights of these exciting events now being planned in Canada for WMY 2000 In celebration of the World Mathematical Year the CMS and CAIMS Canadian Applied and Industrial Mathematics Society have agreed to meet together for the first time in a joint annual meeting June 10 14 2000 in Hamilton Ontario These two societies will be joined by the Canadian Operations Research Society the Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Mathematics the Canadian Symposium on Fluid Dynamics and the Canadian Undergraduate Mathematics Conference This Year 2000 joint societies meeting is expected to bring together the largest number of Canadian mathematical scientists from across Canada ever assembled in one place It is itself an historic event for Canada Mathematicians from around the world are welcome to join this celebration program information will be available soon at the web site http www math ca Closely coordinated with this joint societies meeting in June 2000 the Fields Institute will host a Symposium on the Legacy of John Charles Fields at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto June 7 9 2000 This Symposium is supported also by the CMS CAIMS Centre de recherches mathématiques and the Pacific Institute for Mathematical Sciences It will help to inform all Canadians of our unsung hero in the mathematical sciences the visionary John Charles Fields and his exceptional legacy to the world of mathematics He established the world s highest award for achievement in mathematics now known internationally as the Fields Medal and often referred to as the Nobel Prize of Mathematics It is struck by the Canadian Mint of Canadian gold and shows the head of the ancient Greek mathematician Archimedes on the face A scientific highlight of the Symposium will be presentations by Fields Medal winners of their medal winning work and its impact on modern mathematics Sir Michael Atiyah will deliver the Banquet Address on Friday evening Professor Tom Archibald of Acadia University will give a plenary lecture on the life and times of John Charles Fields As well as raising awareness of mathematics in Canada this Symposium will be a significant retrospective contribution to World Mathematical Year 2000 Negotiations are underway to produce a documentary video and book as a lasting record of this unique event In Montreal Operation Métro 2000 is being organized under the leadership of Christiane Rousseau with support from CRM and CMS and other sources This initiative will place posters

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  • Mathematics In Europe - Newsletter 9 Autumn 2000
    which there has been considerable discussion on planning Mike is an Honorary Professor at Bangor and also Professor Emeritus at Manchester University where he was Professor of Mathematical Logic till 1980 He now has ten years experience in educational software part of it working with a strong multimedia company in Liverpool Mike has already redeveloped the web site for the project http www bangor ac uk ma CPM rpamath Contributions to this and comments are welcomed especially those which show the broad nature of the collaborations on this project The web site is important for showing what is being done Suggestions comments files links should be sent to Bu e Posta adresi istenmeyen posta engelleyicileri tarafından korunuyor Görüntülemek için JavaScript etkinleştirilmelidir Ronnie Brown gave a computer presentation explaining the methodological principles underlying the construction of the 1989 Exhibition Mathematics and Knots by the Bangor team R Brown N D Gilbert T Porter These principles were in two parts i structure and ii content i Structure The exhibition was designed to be reproducible transportable not requiring management and supervision We were fortunate to have excellent graphic design advice over the design period of four years to attain these ends ii Content This we feel was the most original part The title should really be Mathematics through Knots since the aim was to explain some basic methods of mathematics to the general public Thus part of the intention was to show mathematics as valuable in itself and to show how the pursuit of these methods and aims led to applications which could not be seen from the start We also came to realise that the exhibition format is one of the hardest It is not enough to show things or ideas there has to be an overlying philosophy an intention on the impression that is to be conveyed to the viewer and each aspect of the exhibition has to fit with that intention Each board has to tell a story in itself as far as possible by graphical means and yet each board has to be related to the others It should now be clear why the development and realisation of this structure took four years The methods which were displayed through knots were representation classification invariants breaking a complicated object or procedure into simple parts laws analogy applications Part of the overall aims were advanced mathematics from an elementary viewpoint making mathematics concrete Putting the exhibition on the web in 1997 allowed the description of these aims and much other material to be incorporated into various levels of the hypertext keeping the original boards at the top level Thus the web format turns out to be a wonderful and flexible tool An unforeseen consequence of making the exhibition was the collaboration with the sculptor John Robinson and the web sites of his sculptures and the knot exhibition are expected to form a core of the CDROm s in preparation for the RPAMath project Acknowledgements The main support for the original exhibition came from COPUS Committee for the Public Understanding of Science and for the web presentation from the Philip Trust and the London Mathematical Society Challenges Opportunities and Strategies for South South Co operation in Science and Technology in the 21st Century Mohamed H A Hassan Executive Director Third World Academy of Sciences TWAS Secretary General Third World Network of Scientific Organizations TWNSO Introduction The South enters the third millennium facing monumental challenges when it comes to efforts for economic progress and sustainable and equitable development At the core of these challenges is the ability of the South to participate in and benefit from the rapid advances in scientific research and technological innovations that now drive economic and social development These powerful forces are largely controlled by industrialized countries in the North and are mostly directed to address the problems and needs of rich countries The South as a whole contributes little to modern science and technology Yet if acquired and properly utilized new trends in science and technology offer immense possibilities for solving many of the problems impeding economic and social progress in the South The South must therefore intensify co operative efforts to enhance its indigenous capacity to generate manage and utilize science and technology in ways that address its own basic needs For this to take place regional and inter regional efforts must be vigorously pursued The ultimate goal of these efforts should be to develop collaborative programmes in capacity building for scientific education and research and to establish new regional alliances among academia governments and industries to address real life problems This background paper discusses the challenges and opportunities for South South co operation in science and technology and presents several strategies for strengthening collaboration among developing countries Such strategies which must be firmly anchored to the best available science and technology in the South are most likely to succeed through networked centres of excellence focusing on problems of common concern Challenges to South South Co operation in Science and Technology The most critical challenge facing the developing world is how to bridge the huge gap between the North and the South in the production and utilization of scientific and technological knowledge Measured in terms of publications the science rich North representing 20 of humanity contributes more than 90 of the world s share of current scientific knowledge meanwhile the science poor South representing 80 of humanity generates less than 10 of this knowledge In terms of technological output measured by patents the inequality is much greater The South s 1995 share of patents held by the two largest and most international patent systems in the USA and Europe amounted to less than 1 of the world s total What is more disturbing is that the North South divide in scientific output and technological innovations is constantly widening On the one hand the North with its huge investments in research and development R and D is rapidly advancing the frontier of scientific knowledge On the other hand developing countries are spending small proportions of their gross domestic product GDP often less than 1 percent on R and D Put another way the world s total R and D expenditure in 1994 was about US Dollar 470 billion only 10 of that amount was attributed to the South This makes it very difficult for the South to develop their capacity to catch up Huge investments in scientific research and knowledge in the past 30 years have been the driving force behind the considerable wealth and high living standards now being enjoyed by the North In 1995 the income share of the richest 20 of humanity was 86 of the world s total Other statistics tell the same story For example the richest 20 of humanity s ratio of income compared to that of the poorest 20 of humanity rose from 30 1 in 1960 to 61 1 in 1991 to 82 1 in 1995 Reducing these disparities will be a major challenge facing South South co operation in the 21st century Previous efforts by national governments and international development agencies to overcome poverty and stimulate growth in developing countries have not recorded much success Rapid globalization driven by revolutionary advances in technology and information and communication systems and characterized by economic liberalization free trade and increased competition have often widened the gap between poor and rich nations The impact of globalization on the composition of financial flows for instance has been dramatic Overseas development aid a major source of external funding for development projects in poor countries slid from US 56 4 billion in 1990 to US 44 2 billion in 1996 At the same time foreign direct investment and private financial flows soared from US 41 9 billion to US 256 billion Such trends have benefited only a few developing countries with large economies The primary challenge then is how South South co operation can help the majority of developing countries close the knowledge gap and effectively respond to and benefit from rapid globalization by enhancing their capacities in science technology and knowledge Such efforts will serve as cornerstones for the transition of the South to sustainable economic growth and development The second important challenge relates to finding solutions to the critical real life problems confronting most Third World countries Such problems include poverty tropical diseases food energy and water shortages and their adverse impacts on biological resources climate and water quality Harvard University economist Jeffrey Sachs contends that since poor countries are mostly located in ecological zones different from those in the North they face different health and agricultural problems and that those differences are often a fundamental cause of persisting poverty The challenge for South South co operation therefore is how to mobilize the best science in the South and elsewhere and direct it towards development problems in the developing world Opportunities for South South Co operation in Science and Technology The revolution in information and communication technologies has created unprecedented opportunities to narrow the knowledge gap between the North and the South by providing equitable access to the world s stock of scientific knowledge to everyone everywhere Through electronic mail and the internet data can now be instantly transferred across vast distances providing science poor countries with the possibility of access to the latest scientific and technological information for addressing local and global problems In fact scientists in the South with internet facilities can now communicate easily with each other and their colleagues in the North to form new virtual networks and global research teams But many members of the world community cannot fully participate in and benefit from this information revolution Unfavourable economic conditions and the high cost of wire line infrastructure have made it difficult to provide these facilities to people in poor Third World countries particularly those living in remote areas The total number of telephone lines in the 48 LDCs is 1 of the number of lines in the USA Only 1 of the world s telephone lines are in Africa and about half of these are in South Africa alone On the other hand rapid advances in wireless digital systems based on satellites or cellular transceivers can provide a much less expensive and permanent solution to communication problems in developing countries Among the many advantages of wireless telecommunication systems over wire based systems are that they can be developed quickly and are not affected by natural hazards Several developing countries Argentina Brazil and China for instance are investing heavily in digital communication systems Telephone networks in such small countries as Botswana Djibouti Ghana Maldives Mauritius and Qatar are now completely digital bypassing the older wire based systems and leapfrogging to this new technology This trend deserves to be emulated by other developing countries The new information age will soon make it possible for any scholar teacher or student to acquire a cheap small portable computer that will provide access to virtually any source of information anywhere anytime Another important opportunity relates to the applications of innovative techniques in biotechnology and genetic engineering to improve food production preserve the environment and natural resources and combat tropical diseases Although most of the current research in this rapidly advancing field is carried out in the laboratories of the North several developing countries including Argentina Brazil China Cuba India Mexico and Singapore have established research programmes in modern biology and biotechnologies of high standard These countries are in a strong position to assist others in the South to develop their local capacities in this vitally important field Still another opportunity for developing countries is related to the distribution of the world s natural resources The developing world is blessed with vast natural resources and possesses most of the world s biodiversity as well as much of the deeply rooted traditional knowledge associated with these genetic assets The South however has not yet gained much from its natural riches Many developing lack the scientific and technical skills and financial resources to protect and sustainably exploit these irreplaceable biological resources In a world economy driven by globalization and competitiveness the South will likely find its natural resources to be one of its best comparative advantages Meanwhile big multinational pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies in the North have expanded their bioprospecting and gene hunting in developing countries In 1990 world sales of medicine derived from plants discovered by indigenous people totalled US 43 billion Yet people in the South received little financial benefit from these commercial efforts Similarly the 1998 World Development Report noted that a unique plant in Madagascar used by a global pharmaceutical company to develop two anti cancer drugs generated more than US 100 million in sales with no financial returns to the country Such large developing countries as India Brazil and China have devised biodiversity laws to protect their genetic resources from biopiracy However the trade off between stricter protection laws as called for by India and China and relatively liberal legislation as advocated by Brazil must be carefully assessed against the ultimate goal of protecting local interests and encouraging foreign investment Developing countries must work together to build their capacities in genomics science and develop skills in international property right and patent issues to be able to negotiate bioprospecting agreements with foreign companies that would maximize the benefits to their economy and local communities Strategies for South South Co operation in Science and Technology Any strategy to promote South South collaboration must bear in mind the diversity of countries in the South These countries vary enormously in size China has a population of 1 2 billion almost twice the population of the 48 Least Developed Countries LDCs Some large countries such as Argentina Brazil China India Mexico South Africa and South Korea have enviable records of scientific achievement compared to the others A few for example South Korea Malaysia Singapore and China Taiwan have made considerable economic and technological progress in recent years Yet many LDCs have not experienced significant development for some time Nevertheless regardless of their size and stage of development every country in the South lags behind every country in the North in terms of wealth scientific and technical productivity and military power The most productive and beneficial South South co operation strategies are those anchored to the best science in the South Without the full engagement of the South s most outstanding institutions and most accomplished scientists South South co operation will not make a real difference For this reason it is necessary to develop a comprehensive audit of institutions and individuals that have achieved excellence in scientific research and training in the South The Third World Network of Scientific Organizations TWNSO in collaboration with the Third World Academy of Sciences TWAS and the South Centre recently took a major step in this direction when in 1998 the three organizations published a book profiling the capabilities of 430 scientific institutions of excellence in 52 developing countries These institutions have expressed a readiness to participate in regional inter regional and international networks and scientific exchanges and training programmes for young scientists from developing countries other than their own Many of the institutions have achieved levels of competence comparable to institutions in industrialized countries Human resources development should be a top priority in South South co operation strategies The dearth of highly qualified scientists and technologists in most Third World countries has hampered the development and application of science and technology to the socio economic needs in the South and has been a key factor behind the large number of foreign consultants in the LDCs As Thomas Odhiambo former president of the African Academy of Sciences recently observed roughly 100 000 high level experts equivalent to the number of foreign experts working in Africa were part of Africa s brain drain during the 1990s Major efforts therefore should be mounted to fully utilize institutions of excellence in the developing world to train young scientists from countries with inadequate research and training facilities To facilitate this goal governments in the South and international development agencies should co sponsor a massive programme of scholarships to enable students to pursue graduate and postgraduate education in these institutions South South co operation in postgraduate training at institutions of excellence in the South has several advantages Apart from being much less expensive than training in the North it promotes the indigenous generation and application of knowledge and could help slow the brain drain Furthermore training a new generation of scientists in Southern institutions will encourage these scientists to build scientific collaboration with their peers in the South and to build permanent links with the institutions at which they obtained their training An important initiative in this direction has recently been taken by the Third World Organization for Women in Science TWOWS in collaboration with the Third World Academy of Sciences TWAS With financial support from the Swedish Agency for Research Co operation with Developing Countries Sida SAREC a postgraduate fellowship programme has been established to enable young female students from the LDCs to pursue their PhD studies at centres of excellence in the South The large number of applications received from talented female students more than 150 for 25 openings demonstrates the demand for such South South initiatives The South s efforts to achieve science led sustainable development depends on fully engaging its most able and talented minds Special programmes like the Math and Physics Olympiads aimed at identifying and encouraging youthful talent should be supported through South South collaboration at the regional and inter regional levels Gifted children selected for these programmes should be nurtured in an environment conducive to the development of their talent This can be achieved through the creation of a specialized system of schools and colleges for gifted children The South Korean government pursued such a strategy when it established several highly competitive high schools for training talented children and the Korean Institute of Technology KIT to enable them to pursue their university undergraduate education The system has been instrumental

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  • Mathematics In Europe - Editors
    matematik Karışık Misyon Hoşgeldin Mesajları EMS Destekçiler Diller Iletişim Yasal Bilgi arama The European Mathematical Society Our Sponsor Munich RE Editors Ayrıntılar Kategori WMY 2000 Prof Mireille Chaleyat Maurel Université René Descartes UFR de Mathématiques et Informatique 45 rue des Saints Pères F 75006 PARIS France e mail Bu e Posta adresi istenmeyen posta engelleyicileri tarafından korunuyor Görüntülemek için JavaScript etkinleştirilmelidir Prof Gérard Tronel Université Pierre et Marie Curie Laboratoire

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  • Mathematics In Europe - Editorial Board
    tarafından korunuyor Görüntülemek için JavaScript etkinleştirilmelidir Prof Mitsuo Morimoto Department of Mathematics International Christian University 3 10 2 Osawa Mitaka shi TOKYO 181 8585 Japan e mail Bu e Posta adresi istenmeyen posta engelleyicileri tarafından korunuyor Görüntülemek için JavaScript etkinleştirilmelidir Prof Mogens Niss Secretary ICMI IMFUFA Roskilde University P O Box 260 Miramare DK 4000 ROSKILDE Denmark e mail Bu e Posta adresi istenmeyen posta engelleyicileri tarafından korunuyor Görüntülemek için

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  • Mathematics In Europe - Acknowledgements
    can be found here Home Anasayfa Anasayfa Haberler Bilgiler Halka ulaşma faaliyetleri Yarışmalar Matematik Yardım Meslek olarak matematik Karışık Misyon Hoşgeldin Mesajları EMS Destekçiler Diller Iletişim Yasal Bilgi arama The European Mathematical Society Our Sponsor Munich RE Acknowledgements Ayrıntılar Kategori WMY 2000 The Editorial board wishes to thank the following institutions for help and sponsorship UNESCO IMU Comité National Français des Mathématiciens Collège de France École Polytechnique Institut des Hautes

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  • Mathematics In Europe - The European Mathematical Society
    education Its main aims are to promote mathematical research foster interaction between mathematicians of different countries establish a sense of identity amongst European mathematicians represent the mathematical community in European institutions Benefits of membership The principal reasons for joining the European Mathematical Society may be altruistic to encourage European mathematicians to cooperate to support European mathematicians working under difficult circumstances to support efforts to get backing for mathematics from the

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  • Mathematics In Europe - Hjælp til Matematik
    Danish can be found here Home Hjælp til Matematik Startside Nyheder Information PR aktiviteter for matematik Konkurrencer Hjælp til Matematik Matematiske begreber på andre sprog Matematik som erhverv Andet materiale Mission Velkommen EMS Sponsor Sprogene Kontakt Juridisk ansvarlige Søg The European Mathematical Society Our Sponsor Munich RE Math Help Detaljer Kategori General One of the most important goals of this page is to provide assistance in understanding various aspects of

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  • Mathematics In Europe - Mission
    og at der kun er ganske få om overhovedet nogen som helst sammenhæng mellem matematik og den virkelige verden Den opfattelse står i grel kontrast til de faktiske kendsgerninger Matematik er en helt afgørende ingrediens i adskillige sammenhænge som direkte vedrører vort daglige liv Matematik er en fascinerende videnskab Et matematisk problem kan fange dine tanker og optage dig så meget at du kan beskæftige dig kreativt med det i dagevis månedsvis ja endog i flere år Uden matematikken er det direkte umuligt at forstå hvordan andre videnskaber beskriver verden Relativitetsteorierne kvantemekanikken osv kan ikke dyrkes og forstås uden de relevante matematiske værktøjer Formålet med denne hjemmeside er at åbne op for og præsentere disse kendsgerninger og dermed forhåbentlig bidrage til at promovere matematikken som en levende og dagsaktuel videnskab Hjemmesiden henvender sig til Enhver som er interesseret i matematik Journalister elever på de gymnasiale uddannelser studerende på universiteterne lærere og professionelle matematikere Enhver som leder efter forslag til hvordan matematikken kan promoveres i det offentlige rum Vi vil dog gerne pointere at det ikke er vores primære formål her at beskrive eller udfolde resultaterne fra den aktuelle matematiske forskningsfront men vi håber at langt det meste det materiale som

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